Science & Chill
Episode 12:  Genetic Engineering and the Importance of Science Communication with Dr. Kevin Folta

Episode 12: Genetic Engineering and the Importance of Science Communication with Dr. Kevin Folta

June 1, 2020

In episode 12 of Science & Chill, I interview Dr. Kevin Folta.

Dr. Folta is a professor in the department of horticultural sciences at the University of Florida. 

He received his bachelors and master’s degrees in biology from northern illinois university and his PhD in molecular biology from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He’s received various awards throughout his career including the National Science Foundation Career Award in 2008, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Distinguished Mentor Award in 2007, and the Borlaug CAST communication award in 2016. 

Dr. Folta’s research focuses on the functional genomics of small fruit crops, the genetic basis of flavors, photomorphogenesis in controlled environments, and small molecule discovery. 

In addition to his scientific research, Dr. Folta is a fabulous science communicator; using workshops to teach scientists how to communicate their science effectively. He is also continuously active in public engagement and outreach, and can often be found voicing his personal and scientific opinions on Twitter, among other social media platforms. 

The journal Nature Biotechnology has described Dr. Folta as “a gifted communicator -- one of the rare scientists who has engaged the public, with over 12 years experience behind him. Not someone who merely discusses public engagement, but someone who actually communicates directly with non-expert audiences.”

Part of his science communication comes in the form of podcasting. Dr. Folta hosts a podcast called “Talking Biotech”, 5 years old and in the top 20 of downloaded life sciences podcasts, where he interviews a variety of scientists to discuss genetics and other issues in biotechnology (and lots of other science topics). This is actually how I became acquainted with you, Kevin, as I appeared on episode 180 of your podcast to briefly discuss science communication and participate in an interview with a researcher doing work on sleep and DNA damage in the brain. Thanks for that, by the way. 

Some may call Dr. Folta a controversial figure -- only in that he has been highly outspoken about his research in his attempts to clearly communicate science with the public.

This episode is wide ranging and very relevant to scientific and cultures issues of today. Hope you enjoy!

 

Relevant links

Follow Dr. Folta on Twitter

Dr. Folta's Research (Google Scholar)

Talking Biotech Podcast

Episode of Talking Biotech where I appeared (Episode 180)

Dr. Folta's Blog (Illumination 2.0)

 

Podcast links

Science & Chill on YouTube

Subscribe on Apple Podcasts

Support Science & Chill on Patreon

Physiology Friday Episode 4: Twice-Weekly HIIT Superior to Four Sessions per Week to Promote Endurance Adaptations

Physiology Friday Episode 4: Twice-Weekly HIIT Superior to Four Sessions per Week to Promote Endurance Adaptations

May 29, 2020

In today’s episode, I talk about a study looking at whether more or less (frequency) is better when it comes to high intensity interval training.

Episode 11: Obesity, Health Disparities, and Gender Equity in Academia with Dr. Michelle Cardel

Episode 11: Obesity, Health Disparities, and Gender Equity in Academia with Dr. Michelle Cardel

May 25, 2020

In episode 11 of Science and Chill, I interview Dr. Michelle Cardel. 

Dr. Cardel is a researcher and scientist in obesity and nutrition and also a registered dietitian working in the Department of Health Outcomes and Biomedical Informatics at the University of Florida; she’s a fellow gator. 

Dr. Cardel’s education background includes a Bachelor’s degree in biology from Florida State University, a Master’s degree in clinical nutrition from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and a PhD from UAB as well. After earning her PhD, Dr. Cardel completed a dietetics internship at UAB and the Alaskan Native Medical Center located in Anchorage, Alaska, and she also completed postdoctoral work at the University of Colorado Medical Center. She’s a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Obesity Society, and the American Society for Nutrition.

Her current focus includes nutrition, obesity, weight management, pediatric obesity, and the psychosocial factors that contribute to obesity and health disparities in underserved and minority populations. 

In addition to talking about some of the causes and treatments for obesity, we cover a paper that Dr. Cardel recently published on the reasons for gender inequity in the ranks of academia and higher level positions with the university system. 

 

Relevant links

- Follow Michelle on Twitter: @MichelleCardel

- Dr. Cardel's professional Facebook page

- Dr. Cardel's University of Florida profile

- Dr. Cardel's publications (Google Scholar)

- Paper referenced: "Turning Chutes into Ladders for Women Faculty: A Review and Roadmap for Equity in Academia"

- Paper referenced: "Ultra-Processed Diets Cause Excess Calorie Intake and Weight Gain"

 

Science & Chill

- Follow Science and Chill on YouTube!

- Support the podcast on Patreon!

- Science & Chill on Itunes

Physiology Friday Ep 3. Ketone Supplement Fails to Affect Glycogen Use or Cycling Performance

Physiology Friday Ep 3. Ketone Supplement Fails to Affect Glycogen Use or Cycling Performance

May 22, 2020

In this week's installment of Physiology Friday, I discuss a recent studying showing that an exogenous ketone ester has no effect on glycogen utilization or high-intensity cycling performance above consuming carbohydrates alone. 

 

Link to study:

Exogenous ketosis impacts neither performance nor muscle glycogen breakdown in prolonged endurance exercise

 

Episode 10: Crossover with Kyle & Corey Unplugged

Episode 10: Crossover with Kyle & Corey Unplugged

May 20, 2020

In this special, off-beat episode of Science & Chill, I sit down with my great friends Kyle and Corey to record a "hybrid" episode of our podcasts. 

 

The conversation is wide ranging, and we touch upon things like weight stigma, COVID-19, morning routines, sports, and much more. 

Physiology Friday Ep. 2: A High-Salt Diet Increases Blood Pressure Response to Exercise

Physiology Friday Ep. 2: A High-Salt Diet Increases Blood Pressure Response to Exercise

May 15, 2020

In this week's episode of Physiology Friday, I discuss a recent study that investigated the effects of a high-salt diet on the blood pressure response to exercise and endothelial function. Enjoy! 

 

Study: High Salt Intake Augments Blood Pressure Responses During Submaximal Aerobic Exercise

Random Show with Jack Butler: Running, Millennial Things, Immortality, and More!

Random Show with Jack Butler: Running, Millennial Things, Immortality, and More!

May 11, 2020

In this episode of the podcast, I interview my longtime friend Jack Butler. Jack and I met each other through the sport of running, and have continued our personal and athletic relationship to this day.

Jack was also interviewing me for HIS podcast, so this is a bit of a two-way interview. We talk about our history in running, why we still run, and our thoughts on some of the more "cultural" aspects of running.

In addition, we speak on some topics concerning human longevity and why we do or don't want to live forever.

I hope you enjoy this conversation...I had a blast!

Relevant links:

Check out Jack's podcast:

- Itunes

- Ricochet

Follow Jack on Twitter: @jackbutler4815

Jack's writer profile for the National Review

- Science & Chill on YouTube 

- Subscribe to Science & Chill on Apple Podcasts

- Become a supporter on Patreon! 

Physiology Friday Ep. 1: Can Sprinting for 4-seconds Every Hour Prevent the Negative Effects of Sitting?

Physiology Friday Ep. 1: Can Sprinting for 4-seconds Every Hour Prevent the Negative Effects of Sitting?

May 1, 2020

In this week's installment of Physiology Friday, I review a recent study which looked at whether breaking up sitting time with short bouts of 4-second sprints could improve the metabolic response to a high-fat, high-carbohydrate meal the next day. 

 

Relevant links

Study: Hourly 4-s Sprints Prevent Impairment of Postprandial Fat Metabolism from Inactivity.

Support the podcast on Patreon

Subscribe on Itunes

Episode 8: Fat Adaptation, Ultramarathon Physiology, and Coaching Science with Jason Koop

Episode 8: Fat Adaptation, Ultramarathon Physiology, and Coaching Science with Jason Koop

April 25, 2020

Jason Koop is the head coach for CTS-ultrarunning, where he has managed hundreds of coaches and athletes to ultra marathon running success. But he doesn’t just coach, Jason is a talented and experienced ultrarunner himself, having finished ultramarathon races including the Badwater 135, Leadville trail 100, and the Western States 100.

Jason is also the author of the book “Training Essentials for Ultra Running: How to Train Smarter, Race Faster, and Optimize Your Ultramarathon Performance." Jason is also a podcaster in his own right; he hosts a podcast called The Koop Cast, which can be found on all major podcast platforms. I definitely suggest you check that out after you’ve listened to our conversation if you want to learn even more about the science behind running and some of Jason’s coaching philosophy.

In this episode, we cover a variety of topics including the science of low-carb diets and fat adaptation for endurance performance, how to coach and train for an ultramarathon, and what types of variables you should monitor to guide training. We also dig into Jason's coaching philosophy, how he determines which research is valuable, and the benefits and risks of "junk miles."

Show notes and links:

- Support this podcast on Patreon

- Subscribe on Itunes

- YouTube Video of This Podcast 

- Jason's CTS Coach Page

- Follow Jason on Twitter @JasonKoop

- Jason's Personal Website 

- Listen to Jason's Podcast the KoopCast 

- Get Jason's Book!!!

Episode 7: How a Lack of Sleep Affects Mitochondrial Health with Dr. Nicholas Saner

Episode 7: How a Lack of Sleep Affects Mitochondrial Health with Dr. Nicholas Saner

April 17, 2020

In episode 7 of Science & Chill, I talk with Dr. Nicholas Saner, a clinical research administrator at the Baker Institute in Melbourne Australia.

Dr. Saner completed his PhD in physiology from Victoria University, where his final project focused on the effects of sleep restriction on muscle protein synthesis and metabolic function. This paper caught my eye, and I wanted to interview Nick about this study in particular, as well as some of his other research pursuits, which have including genetics and their influence on army recruit performance and injury risk, as well as his current work using exercise for cancer therapy.

I hope you enjoy this episode. You can find links to relevant papers, Dr. Saner's research, and other topics in the show notes below.

Relevant links

- Follow Nick on Twitter: @NickSaner

- Baker Institute website

- Dr. Saner's paper on sleep restriction and muscle protein synthesis (discussed in the podcast)

- Link to YouTube interview of this podcast

- Support Science & Chill on Patreon